Software is about people wallpaper

One thing I've noticed since starting to work for &yet is how much pride everyone takes in the company; the employee love for &yet is prominently on display, and it seems like everyone is repping at least one piece of &yet swag at all times.

Our very own Kate took some time out of her busy schedule earlier this year and turned some of Amy's work into some awesomely fun wallpapers for all of us at &yet to enjoy. We have been absolutely loving them, and we figured it's about time to release them for everyone!

From ...

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SimpleWebRTC Logo

Hey guess what? Today is SimpleWebRTC beta release day! We know how difficult using WebRTC can be, so we decided to make it simple (see the play on words there?).

SimpleWebRTC allows you to add video, voice, text chat, and screen-sharing to your app with easy to use React components. And as of today, you can try it out for free.

WebRTC Illustration

What about the old version?

This version of SimpleWebRTC is quite different than previous versions. It uses React, for one. There are lots of other differences, which we wrote about earlier this week.

We hope you give the new ...

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When evaluating programmers, it’s very easy to see the value of someone writing a lot of new code. Do not, however, fall into the trap of only valuing developers that write quickly. A healthy project has a mix of developers in terms of values, strengths, and weaknesses.

One productive way to categorize programmers is starters and finishers.

A starter creates a vision for new code and writes the initial version, prototype, or skeleton. Starters usually lack motivation for bringing the project to the next level, making it easier for others to work on the code, or generally polishing. That ...

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Very soon we’ll be shipping a brand new version of SimpleWebRTC, and everything about it is different.

What’s different?

The biggest feature of the soon-to-be-released version of SimpleWebRTC is that it will just be a bunch of flexible React components.

These components will make it so that anyone with a basic understanding of React can build advanced WebRTC applications. No need to understand anything about how connections are set up, no need to set up signaling or STUN/TURN servers, and it gets even better than that.

One of the hardest things about building a WebRTC app is ...

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Earlier this year, we teamed up with our friends at npm to design some shirts for Pride. When they asked us about working with them on the project, we said, “Yes, please!” and then had an idea to do something of our own.

We believe being People First means standing with the LGBTQI+ community during Pride month (and every other month). In 2015 one of our designers, Amy Lynn Taylor, made a version of our logo with the Pride colors to show our support for Marriage Equality. We really like the design and, in true &yet fashion, thought it was ...

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To the thousands of people who made Talky calls on February 14, 2017, Talky didn’t seem much different. There were some icon and button color changes, but nothing to write home about. However, it was a very big day in our world.

For the past couple of years, we've been transitioning Talky from AmpersandJS to React. The reason for the transition is an article on its own, but to put it simply, I only need one word. Components, heard of 'em?

During the rewrite, we moved the core functionality of Talky into its own library of super slick ...

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On the last page of Matt Nelson's seminal work "#WeRateDogs: The Most Hilarious and Adorable Pups You've Ever Seen", you'll find a definition for the word "zoom":

zoom /zoom/ noun

  1. A very speedy move done by a dog. Incredibly hard to document, but universally recognized as a thing that happens. Appears to break laws of physics, but only because when your dog does something average, you think it is the greatest thing ever.

Most dog owners (and even owners of some ambitious cats) are familiar with these "zooms", also referred to as "zoomies". For those of you ...

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One of the weird and wonderful perks of being in the tech industry is the sheer volume of events available for everyone to attend, whether your interest is broad or tunnel-vision specific. We’ve thrown our fair share of events (RealtimeConf, RedisConf, &yetconf, to name a few) and others on our team have been organizers of events around the globe.

Recently, our teammate Lynn Fisher suggested we discuss what makes a conference meaningful.

What are some examples of great conferences you’ve been to who executed things well?

Lynn Fisher, Designer, Developer
I went to An Event Apart in 2010 ...

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A Talky rocket flying amongst the clouds

In the DevOps world, Kubernetes is kind of a big deal. Since 2014, when development first began, Kubernetes has become the preeminent container orchestration tool for running containerized applications on the web. When I joined &yet in 2016, I was new to the world of DevOps, but since then I’ve had the opportunity to use Kubernetes on four different cloud platforms: Packet, Amazon Web Services (AWS), Microsoft Azure, and Google Cloud. That experience has demonstrated the consistent power of Kubernetes across different platforms and the freedom it give teams to change providers as cloud technology evolves.

One of my ...

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A few months ago I became a team lead. It was a pretty unexpected role shift. I’d always considered myself more of a worker bee than a leader. When the opportunity was presented to me, I didn’t let the idea sink in very long before I said ‘yes.’ Only I didn’t really say ‘yes.’ I said something like ‘Well, there are a few things about that role that I feel I might be good at, and lots of things that I’ll definitely need to learn.’ Luckily that passes for a ‘yes’ at &yet, and I was ...

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