Illustration of yeti faces in a video call.

&yet has been remote-friendly for a long time, but right now we’re the most remote we’ve ever been. We have team members in Seattle, Portland, Folsom, Phoenix, Pennsylvania, and Germany. The folks in Tri-Cities, Washington (a sort of “HQ”) work remotely too from co-working spaces, coffee shops, and home offices.

We love gathering together, but sometimes it’s just not an option. So this past December we decided to try an all-remote holiday party. Some activities worked really well and others not as much. Here’s a rundown of what we did!

👍 Recommendations

We all gathered in a ...

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In December the &yet team had an all-day, all-remote holiday party. One of our activities was live-collaborating on a Recommendations doc for all the things we enjoyed throughout 2018 (and earlier years too). There’s some good stuff in here so we figured we’d share it with you!

(Things are organized in the order they were added and include some comments that were left in the document, too.)

Books (nonfiction)

  • One From Many by Dee Hock
  • Principles by Ray Dalio
  • Let Your Life Speak by Parker Palmer
  • The Omnivore's Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals by Michael ...
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Ever wonder what other people’s home office setups are like? Well my friend, wonder no more. (Okay, you can wonder a little. These are only the setups of a couple of people on our team, which probably do not represent the entirety of the human experience. But anyway. Enjoy.)

Where do you work?

Luke Karrys, Senior developer

Luke's Desk

I work from a spare bedroom in my house. I also spend the very occasional afternoon working from a nearby coffee shop, but most of the time I prefer to work from the same spot every day. My home office only locks ...

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SimpleWebRTC Logo

The original SimpleWebRTC was one of the first Javascript libraries for WebRTC out there; the first public version was released more than five years ago. It offered a simple API that allowed JavaScript developers to prototype stuff quickly without having to understand the intricacies of the WebRTC APIs. “You can build cool stuff with WebRTC in five minutes” was true. Taking it to production at scale remains a bit more difficult.

Under the hood, SimpleWebRTC consisted of a bunch of Javascript modules that let you access the camera, microphone, screen content, a wrapper for the RTCPeerConnection API, and something to ...

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Software is about people wallpaper

One thing I've noticed since starting to work for &yet is how much pride everyone takes in the company; the employee love for &yet is prominently on display, and it seems like everyone is repping at least one piece of &yet swag at all times.

Our very own Kate took some time out of her busy schedule earlier this year and turned some of Amy's work into some awesomely fun wallpapers for all of us at &yet to enjoy. We have been absolutely loving them, and we figured it's about time to release them for everyone!

From ...

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SimpleWebRTC Logo

Hey guess what? Today is SimpleWebRTC beta release day! We know how difficult using WebRTC can be, so we decided to make it simple (see the play on words there?).

SimpleWebRTC allows you to add video, voice, text chat, and screen-sharing to your app with easy to use React components. And as of today, you can try it out for free.

WebRTC Illustration

What about the old version?

This version of SimpleWebRTC is quite different than previous versions. It uses React, for one. There are lots of other differences, which we wrote about earlier this week.

We hope you give the new ...

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When evaluating programmers, it’s very easy to see the value of someone writing a lot of new code. Do not, however, fall into the trap of only valuing developers that write quickly. A healthy project has a mix of developers in terms of values, strengths, and weaknesses.

One productive way to categorize programmers is starters and finishers.

A starter creates a vision for new code and writes the initial version, prototype, or skeleton. Starters usually lack motivation for bringing the project to the next level, making it easier for others to work on the code, or generally polishing. That ...

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Very soon we’ll be shipping a brand new version of SimpleWebRTC, and everything about it is different.

What’s different?

The biggest feature of the soon-to-be-released version of SimpleWebRTC is that it will just be a bunch of flexible React components.

These components will make it so that anyone with a basic understanding of React can build advanced WebRTC applications. No need to understand anything about how connections are set up, no need to set up signaling or STUN/TURN servers, and it gets even better than that.

One of the hardest things about building a WebRTC app is ...

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Earlier this year, we teamed up with our friends at npm to design some shirts for Pride. When they asked us about working with them on the project, we said, “Yes, please!” and then had an idea to do something of our own.

We believe being People First means standing with the LGBTQI+ community during Pride month (and every other month). In 2015 one of our designers, Amy Lynn Taylor, made a version of our logo with the Pride colors to show our support for Marriage Equality. We really like the design and, in true &yet fashion, thought it was ...

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To the thousands of people who made Talky calls on February 14, 2017, Talky didn’t seem much different. There were some icon and button color changes, but nothing to write home about. However, it was a very big day in our world.

For the past couple of years, we've been transitioning Talky from AmpersandJS to React. The reason for the transition is an article on its own, but to put it simply, I only need one word. Components, heard of 'em?

During the rewrite, we moved the core functionality of Talky into its own library of super slick ...

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